COMMONS – The Fall of Constantinople (Brexit and the EU)

COMMONS

Today I’m starting COMMONS. A new series (I hope) of articles related to my interest in current affairs and politics. I want to talk about democracy, global affairs, the EU and Brexit and civics. So here we go:

THE FALL OF CONSTANTINOPLE, BREXIT AND THE EU

The partition of the Roman Empire didn’t work out, for various reasons. Divorces don’t work – almost ever. A split is a split – Islam is divided, Christianity is divided – divorces always create more issues. Christianity split into Orthodoxy (Eastern Church) and Catholicism (Western Church), and then Catholicism split into a hundred different religions including, I suppose, the Church of the Latter Day Saints. One loves a Mormon.

The Byzantine civil war of 1341–47 exhausted Constantinople. The consequences of a series of conflicts proved disastrous for the Byzantine Empire. The infighting made the Empire weaker and more vulnerable to outside forces.

And thus I look at Brexit with grave concern, and I’m not alone. There are great divisions within British society. A Divided Kingdom of Scotland and Northern Ireland versus England and Wales. The British Isles are divided between Remainers and Leavers among hundreds of other issues.

The UK is one of the EU’s strongest economies but more importantly, one of the EU’s supposedly and traditionally most stable political power players. An important EU member that could be (it’s not the first time I’m going to say that) leading the EU and its future.

The decision of the UK to leave the Union is one of many first difficult-to-swallow decisions taken within our Union. The rise of the new far right across the Union, the disgusting AfD in Germany, Polish disintegration, Italy’s new troubles; We are majorly infighting and disagreeing while the global geopolitical landscape is changing fast.

If Brexit goes ahead and the United Kingdom leaves the European Union, with or without a deal, it is highly likely it will set a dangerous precedent, inspire further Euroscepticism and validate neo-right sentiments across the continent.

Europe stands at a crossroads between a future superstate of political, economic and societal alignment and shared sovereignty and the almost dissolution of everything that has been hardly laboured over the last 50 to 70 years after World War 2.

If the EU does not survive it is highly unlikely, long-term, that Germany and any other strong European state hold any position in the global order. History will come back for repayments and history will teach the West a dire lesson.

These of course might sound like far-fetched thoughts, but this is what I’m currently thinking of. In terms of Brexit, if a longer extension is given to the UK and the country holds European Elections, the European Parliament may be infiltrated with more Farages seeking to further spread their view, before an Exit.

Troubling times. This is horribly written.

 

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